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VIQC-23-24-GameManual
VIQRC Full Volume Logo

2023 - 2024


Game Manual


Version 2.1


Changelog


Version 2.1 - October 3, 2023

  • Updated <G1> to include a link to the Code of Conduct Process
  • Updated <SG3> to state that Blocks being returned to the Supply Zone should not disturb other Blocks or contact a Robot
  • Updated <R15> to clarify intent
  • Updated <T17> to clarify multi-division tournament structure

Version 2.0 - August 1, 2023

  • Updated <G2> to clarify intent
  • Added a blue box to <G11> to give notice to the addition of a third Drive Team member for the 2024-2025 and 2025-2026 VIQRC games
  • Updated <SG1> and R16 to allow pre-charging of pneumatics
  • Updated <SG2> to clarify how Robots should be measured horizontally
  • Added a new figure to <SG2> to illustrate the above change
  • Updated <R15> to include the cutting of pneumatic tubing
  • Updated <T1e> to clarify that a Head Referee may only watch one Match at a time
  • Minor typo / formatting fixes

Version 1.0 - June 27, 2023

  • Added a new bullet to <T11> to clarify that the Field Reset Pins are optional
  • Added <R16> to provide regulations on VEX IQ Pneumatics
  • Minor typo fixes

Version 0.2 - June 13, 2023

  • Updated rule <G5> to correct metric conversions
  • Updated typo in rule <SG1> to be Goals I and II
  • Updated Figure 18 to provide further clarity to <SG1>
  • Updated rule <SG3> to include <G10> interactions
  • Updated rule <R4a> to state that Robots may only start a Match contacting the Floor and Field Perimeter
  • Updated rule <R6> to include VEX CTE

Version 0.1 - May 2, 2023

  • Initial Release

Quick Reference Guide

Scoring Rules

<SC1>

All Scoring statuses are evaluated after the Match ends

<SC2>

All Scoring statuses are evaluated visually by a Head Referee

<SC3>

Scored Block criteria

<SC4>

Uniform Goal criteria

<SC5>

Height Bonus criteria

<SC6>

Goal Scoring examples

<SC7>

Parked criteria


Safety Rules

<S1>

Stay safe, don’t damage the Field.

<S2>

Students must be accompanied by an Adult

General Game Rules

<G1>

Treat everyone with respect

<G2>

VEX IQ Robotics Competition is a student-centered program

<G3>

Use common sense

<G4>

The Robot must represent the skill level of the Team

<G5>

Robots begin the Match in the starting size

<G6>

Keep your Robot together

<G7>

Don’t damage the Field

<G8>

Drivers drive your Robot, and stay in the Driver Station

<G9>

Hands out of the Field

<G10>

Handling the Robot mid-match is allowed under certain circumstances

<G11>

A Team’s two Drivers switch Controllers midway through the Match


Specific Game Rules

<SG1>

Pre-match setup.

<SG2>

Horizontal expansion is limited during a Match.

<SG3>

Keep Blocks in the Field

<SG4>

Blocks are randomly loaded in the Supply Zone


Robot Rules

<R1>

One Robot per Team

<R2>

Robots must represent the Team’s skill level

<R3>

Robots must pass inspection

<R4>

Starting configuration

<R5>

Prohibited items

<R6>

VEX IQ product line

<R7>

Non-VEX IQ components

<R8>

Decorations are allowed

<R9>

Officially registered Team numbers must be displayed on Robot License Plates

<R10>

Let it go after the Match is over

<R11>

Robot Brain

<R12>

Motors

<R13>

Batteries

<R14>

Firmware

<R15>

Modifications of parts

<R16>

Pneumatics


Tournament Rules

<T1>

Head Referees have final authority on all gameplay ruling decisions

<T2>

Head Referees must be qualified

<T3>

The Drive Team is permitted to immediately appeal a Head Referee’s ruling

<T4>

Event Partners have final authority regarding all non-gameplay decisions

<T5>

Be at your Match on time

<T6>

Robots at the Field must be ready to play

<T7>

Match Replays are allowed, but rare

<T8>

Disqualifications

<T9>

Timeouts

<T10>

Be prepared for minor Field variance

<T11>

Fields and Field Elements may be repaired at the Event Partner’s discretion

<T12>

Teamwork Matches

<T13>

Ending a Match early

<T14>

Practice Matches may be played at some events, but are not required

<T15>

Qualification Matches will occur according to the official match schedule

<T16>

Each Team will be scheduled Qualification Matches as follows

<T17>

Teams are ranked by their average Qualification Match scores

<T18>

Teams playing in Finals Matches

<T19>

Finals Match Schedule


Robot Skills Challenge Rules

<RSC1>

Standard rules apply in most cases

<RSC2>

Skills Scoring and Ranking at events

<RSC3>

Skills Rankings Globally

<RSC4>

Skills Match Schedule

<RSC5>

Handling Robots during an Autonomous Coding Skills Match

<RSC6>

Starting an Autonomous Coding Skills Match

<RSC7>

Skills Stop Time

Section 1


The Game


Game Description


VEX IQ Robotics Competition Full Volume is played on a 6’x8’ rectangular Field, set up as illustrated in the figures throughout this game manual.

The primary objective of the game is to place Blocks into Goals. Points are awarded based on the number, type, and height of Blocks in each Goal. Points are also available for Clearing the Supply Zone, and for Parking in the Supply Zone at the end of the Match.

In the Teamwork Challenge, an Alliance composed of two (2) Robots works together to score as many points as possible in a sixty (60) second Match.

Teams may also compete in Robot Skills Matches, where one (1) Robot tries to score as many points as possible. See Appendix B for more information.

Note: The illustrations in this section of the Game Manual are intended to provide a general visual understanding of the game. Teams should refer to official field specifications, found in Appendix A, for exact field dimensions, a full field bill of materials, and exact details of field construction.


Figure 1: Starting configuration of the Field for a VEX IQ Robotics Competition Full Volume Match.


About the Game Manual - A Note from the GDC

This Game Manual and its appendices contain everything there is to know about this season’s new game, VIQRC Full Volume. It is intended to be a resource for all Teams, Head Referees, Event Partners, and other members of the VIQRC community.

The rules contained in the following pages can be thought of as “constraints” that define this game, just as engineers begin any design project by defining their constraints. At the beginning of a season, “constraints” are all we have. We don’t know what the winning Robot, best strategy, or most frequently-violated rule will be any more than you do. Isn’t that exciting?

When exploring a new game, please approach this Game Manual with that mentality, and look at rules as “constraints.” The Game Manual and its appendices contain the full and complete list of constraints that are available for a competitor to strategize, design, and build their Robots.

Obviously, all Teams must adhere to these rules, and any stated intents of these rules. However, beyond that, there is no “right” way to play. There are no hidden restrictions, assumptions, or intended interpretations beyond what is written here. So, it is up to you, the competitor, to find the path through these constraints that best suits your Team’s goals and ambitions.


Figure 2: Starting configuration of the Field for a VEX IQ Robotics Competition Full Volume Match.

Updates

This manual will have a series of “major” and “minor” updates over the course of the season. Each version is official and must be used in official VIQRC events until the release of the next version, upon which the previous version becomes void.

Known major release dates are as follows:

May 2, 2023

Version 0.1

Initial game release

May 16, 2023

N/A

Official Q&A system opens

June 13, 2023

Version 0.2

Minor typographical errors or formatting issues found in the initial release. There will be very few rule changes, if any.

June 27, 2023

Version 1.0

May include critical gameplay or rule changes inspired by input from the official Q&A system and the VEX community.

August 1, 2023

Version 2.0

May include gameplay or rule changes inspired by early-season events.

October 3, 2023

Version 2.1

Clarification update only

December 5, 2023

Version 2.2

Clarification update only

January 30, 2024

Version 3.0

May include gameplay or rule changes inspired by mid-season events.

April 2, 2024

Version 4.0

May include critical gameplay or rule clarifications pertaining specifically to the VEX Robotics World Championship



In addition to these known major updates, there may also be unscheduled updates released throughout the season if deemed critical by the GDC. Any unscheduled updates will always be released on a Tuesday, no later than 5:00 PM CST (11:00 PM GMT). These updates will be announced via the VEX Forum, automatically pushed to the VIQRC Hub app, and shared via VEX Robotics / REC Foundation social media & email marketing channels.

Game Manual updates are effective immediately upon release; it is every Team’s responsibility to be familiar with all rules and updates. There are no “grace periods” if an update prohibits a previously legal part, mechanism, or strategy.

Note: REC Foundation Event Support Managers will contact Event Partners involved with multi-week league events that “cross over” an unscheduled update. If a rule change impacts their event (such as a Robot which previously passed inspection no longer being legal), these cases will be reviewed individually depending on the context of the event and the rule that has changed. This is the only possible “grace period” exception.



The Q&A System

When first reviewing a new robotics game, it is natural to have questions about situations which may not be immediately clear. Navigating the Game Manual and seeking out answers to these questions is an important part of learning a new game. In many cases, the answer may just be in a different place than you first thought—or, if there is no rule explicitly prohibiting something, then that usually means it is legal!

However, if a Team is still unable to find an answer to their question after closely reviewing the relevant rules, then every Team has the opportunity to ask for official rules interpretations in the VEX IQ Robotics Competition Question & Answer System. These questions may be posted by a Team’s Adult representative via the RobotEvents account that is associated with that Team.

All responses in this Q&A system should be treated as official rulings from the VEX IQ Robotics Competition Game Design Committee, and they represent the correct and official interpretation of the VEX IQ Robotics Competition Rules. The Q&A system is the only source besides the Game Manual for official rulings and clarifications.

The VEX IQ Robotics Competition Question & Answer System can be found at https://www.robotevents.com/VIQC/2023-2024/QA.

Before posting on the Q&A system, be sure to review the Q&A Usage Guidelines, which can be found at https://www.robotevents.com/VIQC/2023-2024/QA/guidelines.

  1. Read and search the manual before posting.
  2. Read and search existing Q&As before posting.
  3. Quote the applicable rule from the latest version of the manual in your question.
  4. Make a separate post for each question.
  5. Use specific and appropriate question titles.
  6. Questions will (mostly) be answered in the order they were received.
  7. This system is the only source for official rules clarifications.

The 2023-24 Q&A is the ONLY official source for rulings besides the Game Manual. If there are any conflicts between the Game Manual and other supplemental materials (e.g., Referee Certification courses, the VIQRC Hub app, etc.), the most current version of the Game Manual takes precedence.

Similarly, it can never be assumed that definitions, rules, or other materials from previous seasons apply to the current game. Q&A responses from previous seasons are not considered official rulings for the current game. Any relevant clarifications that are needed should always be re-asked in the current season’s Q&A.

General Definitions


Adult – Anyone who is not a Student.


Alliance – A pre-assigned grouping of two (2) Teams that are paired together during a given Teamwork Challenge Match.


Alliance Score – Points scored in a Teamwork Challenge Match that are awarded to both Teams.


Disablement – A penalty applied to a Team for a rule Violation. During Disablement, a Team is no longer allowed to operate their Robot, and the Drivers will be asked to place their Controller on the ground. A Disablement is not the same as a Disqualification.


Disqualification – A penalty applied to a Team for a rule violation (see <T8> for more details). If a Team is Disqualified in a Match, the Head Referee will notify the Team of their Violation at the end of the Match. At the Head Referee’s discretion, repeated violations and/or Disqualifications for a single Team may lead to its Disqualification for the entire event.


Driver – A Student Team member who stands in the Driver Station and is responsible for operating and controlling that Team’s Robot. Up to two Team members may fulfill this role in a given Match (see <G8>).


Driver Station – The region behind the Field where the Drivers must remain during their Match unless legally interacting with their Robot.


Field – The entire playing Field, being six (6) field tiles wide by eight (8) field tiles long (totaling forty-eight (48) field tiles), including the Field Perimeter.


Field Element – The Field Perimeter, Floor, PVC pipes, and VEX IQ elements which are attached to the Field.


Field Perimeter – The outer part of the Field, made up of four (4) outside corners and twenty-four (24) straight sections.


Floor – The interior flat part of the playing Field, made up of the forty-eight (48) field tiles that are within the Field Perimeter.


Game Design Committee (GDC) - The creators of VIQRC Full Volume, and authors of this Game Manual.


License Plate – A physical component on the Robot that displays the Team’s VEX IQ Robotics Competition number. The License Plate must have a length and height of 3.5” x 1.5” (88.9mm x 38.1mm) and must not exceed a width of 0.25” (6.35mm) per <R9>.


Match – A set time period, consisting of Autonomous Periods or Driver Controlled Periods, during which Teams play a defined version of Full Volume to earn points. See Section 3.

  • Autonomous Period – A time period during which Robots operate and react only to sensor inputs and to commands pre-programmed by the Students into the Robot control system.
  • Driver Controlled Period – A time period during which Drivers operate their Robot.

Match Type

Participants

Autonomous Period (m:ss)

Driver Controlled Period (m:ss)

Teamwork Challenge

One Alliance, on one Field, made up of two Teams, each with one Robot

None

1:00

Driving Skills Match

One Team, with one Robot

None

1:00

Autonomous Coding Skills Match

One Team, with one Robot

1:00

None


Robot – A machine that has passed inspection, designed to execute one or more tasks autonomously and/or by remote control from a human operator.


Student – Anyone born after May 1, 2008 (i.e. who will be 15 or younger at VEX Worlds 2024). Eligibility may also be granted based on a disability that has delayed education by at least one year. Students are the individuals who design, build, repair, and program the Robot with minimal Adult assistance.


Team – Two or more Students make up a Team. A Team is classified as an Elementary School Team if all members are Elementary School Students. A Team is classified as a Middle School Team if any member is a Middle School Student, or if the Team is made up of Elementary School Students who declare themselves as “Playing Up” as Middle School Students by registering their Team as a Middle School Team.

Once a Team has competed in an event as a Middle School Team, that Team may not change back to a Elementary School Team for the remainder of the season. Teams may be associated with schools, community/youth organizations, or a group of neighborhood Students.

  • Builder – The Student(s) on the team who assemble(s) the Robot. An Adult cannot be a Builder on a Team. Adults are permitted to teach the Builder(s) associated concepts, but may never work on the Robot without the Builder(s) present and actively participating.
  • Designer – The Student(s) on the Team who design(s) the Robot to be built for competition. An Adult cannot be a Designer on a Team. Adults are permitted to teach the Designer(s) associated concepts, but may never work on the design of the Robot without the Designer(s) present and actively participating.
  • Programmer – The Student(s) on the Team who write(s) the computer code that is downloaded onto the Robot. An Adult cannot be a Programmer on a Team. Adults are permitted to teach the Programmer(s) associated concepts, but may never work on the code that goes on the Robot without the Programmer(s) present and actively participating.

Violation – The act of breaking a rule in the Game Manual.

Some rules include Violation Notes in red italicized text to denote special circumstances or provide additional clarifications. If no Violation Notes are found in a given rule, then it should be assumed that the above “default” definitions apply.

To determine whether a Violation may have been Score Affecting, check whether the Violation directly contributed to increasing the score of the Match. If it did not increase the Alliance’s score, then the Violation was not Score Affecting, and it was very likely a Minor Violation.

See the following flowchart for more information.

Figure 3: The process for determining Violations in VIQRC Full Volume.

Game-Specific Definitions


BlockA green, purple, or red plastic scoring object.

  • Each green Block consists of six sides, is approximately 2” (51mm) to a side, and weighs approximately 1.1 oz (30g). There are fifty four (54) green Blocks on the Field.
  • Each purple Block consists of six sides, is approximately 3” (76mm) to a side, and weighs approximately 1.6oz (45g). There are sixteen (16) purple Blocks on the Field.
  • Each red Block is a partially-rounded octagonal shape, has a major diameter of approximately 5.8” (147mm), and weighs approximately 6.3 oz (180g). There are three (3) red Blocks on the Field.

Cleared – A Supply Zone status. The Supply Zone is considered Cleared if no Blocks are fully within the 3D volume of the Supply Zone at the end of the Match.

Figure 4: Two example Supply Zone states. The example on the left is considered Cleared because even though a Block is still partially within the Supply Zone, it is no longer fully within the Supply Zone. The example on the right would not be considered Cleared, because the Block is still within the boundaries of the Supply Zone.


Fill Level – A Goal attribute that corresponds to the “highest” Block(s) Scored in a given Goal. A Goal can have one of three possible Fill Levels as described below; if a Goal meets the requirements for multiple Fill Levels, it should be assigned the highest of those Fill Levels. Fill Levels are used to determine the overall Height Bonus at the end of the Match.

Fill Level 1: At least one Block is contacting the Floor within the Goal.

Fill Level 2: At least one Block is at least partially above the horizontal line printed on the outside of the Goal.

Fill Level 3: At least one Block is at least partially above the top of the Goal.


Goal – A rectangular-shaped structure built out of VEX IQ parts and clear plastic sheets and connected to a corner of the Field. The VEX IQ parts used to connect a Goal to the Field are not considered part of the Goal.

Note: The “I”, “II”, and “III” labels on each Goal are intended to be common identifiers for Teams and Referees to use instead of referring to them in other ways (e.g. “top-left Goal”). They have no relation to scoring, Fill Levels, Blocks, etc.


Height Bonus – A point bonus awarded at the end of the Match. See rule <SC5>.


Parked – A Robot status at the end of the Match.

Figure 5: Robot A is completely within the Supply Zone, and is Fully Parked. Robot B is breaking the plane of the Supply Zone, and would be considered as Partially Parked. The Alliance would not be considered Double Parked.

Figure 6: Both Robots are completely within the Supply Zone, and Fully Parked. The Alliance would be considered Double Parked.


Scored – A Block status. A Block is considered to be Scored in a Goal if it meets the criteria set forth in rule <SC3>.


Removed – A red Block status. A red Block is considered Removed if it is no longer fully supported by a Starting Peg at the end of the Match.


Starting Peg – One of three (3) Field Elements used for setting up red Blocks at the beginning of a Match.

Figure 7: A Starting Peg.


Supply Zone - An infinitely tall three-dimensional volume of the Field bordered by the outer edges of the red PVC pipe and the outer edges of the Field Perimeter (which coincides with the outer edges of the vertical red VEX IQ beams in 2 of the corners). A predefined number of Blocks begin the Match within the Supply Zone (see rule <SG4>). Teams can receive points for Clearing the Supply Zone, and for using it to Park Robots.

Figure 8: The boundaries of the Supply Zone.

Figure 9: The boundaries of the Supply Zone.

Figure 10: The boundaries of the Supply Zone.

Figure 11: The boundaries of the Supply Zone.



Uniform - A Goal status. A Goal is considered Uniform if it meets the criteria set forth in rule <SC4>.


Scoring


Each Block Scored in a Goal

1 Point

Each Uniform Goal

10 Points

Height Bonus

10 Points per Fill Level (see <SC5>)

Cleared Supply Zone

20 Points

Each Red Block Removed from Starting Peg

5 Points

Each Partially Parked Robot

5 Points

Each Fully Parked Robot

10 Points

Double Parked Bonus

10 Points


<SC1> All Scoring statuses are evaluated after the Match ends, once all Scored Blocks, Field Elements, and Robots on the Field come to rest.

  1. This rule’s intent is for Driver inputs and Robot motion to cease at the end of the Match, when the Match timer reaches 0:00. A pre-programmed routine which causes Robot motion to continue after the end of the Match would violate the spirit of this rule. Any Scoring which takes place after the Match due to Robots continuing to move will not count.

<SC2> All Scoring statuses are evaluated visually by a Head Referee, to the best of their ability within the context of a given Match / event.

  1. Referees and other event staff are not allowed to review any videos or pictures from the Match. See <T3>.
  2. If there is a concern regarding the score of a Match, only the Drivers from that Match, not an Adult, may share their questions with the Head Referee. See <T3>.

Note: In cases where a Scoring status is “too close to call,” Teams will be given the “benefit of the doubt,” and the higher of the two possible Scoring statuses should be assigned. Head Referees will not be expected or required to define a perfect horizontal plane or check imperceptibly small measurements. alliance


<SC3> A Block is considered Scored in a Goal if it meets the following criteria:

  1. The Block is not contacting any Robots.
  2. The Block is at least partially contained within the infinite vertical projection of the outside surfaces of a Goal.
  3. The Block is either contacting the Floor within the Goal (i.e., at Fill Level 1), or transitively contacting the Floor via other Scored Blocks.

    Yes, all Scored

    Yes, all Scored

    The red Block is not Scored, because it is not transitively contacting the Floor within the Goal.


<SC4>
A Goal is considered Uniform if it meets the following criteria:

  1. At least two (2) Blocks are Scored in the Goal.
  2. All Blocks which are Scored in the Goal are of the same type.

Figure 12: This Goal would be considered Uniform, because it contains at least 2 Blocks, all of which are the same type.

Figure 13: This Goal would not be considered Uniform, because not all of the Blocks Scored inside it are the same type.




<SC5> A Height Bonus is awarded for the highest Fill Level shared by all three Goals. If the Fill Levels meet the criteria for multiple Height Bonuses, only the highest of those Bonuses will be awarded.

If all Goals have a Fill Level of...

...then the Height Bonus is

1 or higher

10 points

2 or higher

20 points

3

30 points

In cases where a Fill Level is “too close to call,” Teams will be given the “benefit of the doubt,” and the higher of the two possible Fill Levels should be assigned. Head Referees will not be expected or required to define a perfect horizontal plane within a Goal or check imperceptibly small measurements.


<SC6> Goal Scoring Examples:

Example 1

All three Goals reached Fill Level 2, and all three Goals are considered Uniform.

Total # Blocks: 6

Height Bonus: 20

Total Uniform Bonus: 30

Total: 56

Example 2

Even though Goals II and III reached higher Fill Levels, the overall Height Bonus is still only 10 points because of Goal I’s Fill Level.Goal I is not considered Uniform because it only contains one Block.

Total # Blocks: 7

Height Bonus: 10

Total Uniform Bonus: 20

Total: 37

Example 3

All three Goals reached Fill Level 2. allianceGoal II is not considered Uniform because it only contains one Block.Goal III is not considered Uniform because it has multiple types of Blocks in it.

Total # Blocks: 13

Height Bonus: 20

Total Uniform Bonus: 10

Total: 43



<SC7> Referees will verify if a Robot is Fully or Partially Parked by sliding a right-angle tool (such as a VEX IQ beam/plate) along the outside edge of the red PVC pipe or the Field Perimeter.

Note: Parking is evaluated independently of all other scoring statuses. For example, the Supply Zone does not need to be Cleared in order for Robots to be considered Parked.

Figure 14: This Robot would be considered as Parked, because it is completely within the boundaries of the Supply Zone.

Figure 15: This Robot would be considered as Partially Parked, because it is not completely within the boundaries of the Supply Zone.

Figure 16: This Robot would be considered as Partially Parked, because it is not completely within the boundaries of the Supply Zone.

Figure 17: These Robots would be considered as Double Parked, because they are both completely within the boundaries of the Supply Zone.

Safety Rules


<S1> Stay safe, don’t damage the Field. If, at any time, the Robot operation or Team actions are deemed unsafe or have damaged any Field Elements or Blocks, the offending Team may be Disabled and/or Disqualified at the Head Referee’s discretion. The Robot will require re-inspection before it may again take the Field.


<S2> Students must be accompanied by an Adult. No Student may attend a VEX IQ Robotics Competition event without a responsible Adult supervising them. The Adult must obey all rules and be careful to not violate student-centered policies, but must be present at the event in the case of an emergency. Violations of this rule may result in removal from the event.

General Game Rules


<G1> Treat everyone with respect. All Teams are expected to conduct themselves in a respectful and professional manner while competing in VEX IQ Robotics Competition events. If a Team or any of its members (Students or any Adults associated with the Team) are disrespectful or uncivil to event staff, volunteers, or fellow competitors, they may be Disqualified from a current or upcoming Match. Team conduct pertaining to <G1> may also impact a Team’s eligibility for judged awards. Repeated or extreme violations of <G1> could result in a Team being Disqualified from an entire event, depending on the severity of the situation.

This rule exists alongside the REC Foundation Code of Conduct. Violation of the Code of Conduct can be considered a Major Violation of <G1> and can result in Disqualification from a current Match, an upcoming Match, an entire event, or (in extreme cases) an entire competition season. The Code of Conduct can be found at https://viqc-kb.recf.org/hc/en-us/articles/9778593540247-Code-of-Conduct.

More information regarding the event Code of Conduct process can be found at: https://vrc-kb.recf.org/hc/en-us/articles/16943747839383-Event-Code-of-Conduct-Process

We all can contribute to creating a fun and inclusive event experience for all event attendees. Some examples include:

When dealing with difficult and stressful situations, it is…

  • Okay for Teams to be gracious and supportive when your Alliance partner makes a mistake.
  • Not okay for Teams to harass, tease, or be disrespectful to your Alliance partner when a Match does not go your way.

When a Team does not understand a Match ruling or score, it is…

  • Okay for Drivers to consult with a Head Referee to discuss a ruling per the process outlined in <T3> in a calm and respectful manner.
  • Not okay for Drivers to continue arguing with the Head Referee after a decision has been finalized, or for Adults to approach a Head Referee with ruling/scoring concerns.

When Teams are getting ready for an upcoming Match, it is…

  • Okay for Teams in an Alliance to develop a game strategy that utilizes the strengths of both Robots to cooperatively solve the game.
  • Not okay for one Team in an Alliance to ask another Team to sit in a corner during the Match or to intentionally play beneath their abilities.

Violation Notes: All Violations of <G1> are considered Major Violations and should be addressed on a case-by-case basis. Teams at risk of a <G1> Violation due to multiple disrespectful or uncivil behaviors will usually receive a “final warning”, although the Head Referee is not required to provide one.


<G2> VIQRC is a student-centered program. Adults may assist Students in urgent situations, but Adults may never work on or program a Robot without Students on that Team being present and actively participating. Students must be prepared to demonstrate an active understanding of their Robot’s construction and programming to judges or event staff.

Some amount of Adult mentorship, teaching, and / or guidance is an expected and encouraged facet of VEX competitions. No one is born an expert in robotics! However, obstacles should always be viewed as teaching opportunities, not tasks for an Adult to solve without Students present and actively participating.

When a mechanism falls off, it is…

  • Okay for an Adult to help a Student investigate why it failed, so it can be improved.
  • Not okay for an Adult to put the Robot back together.

When a Team encounters a complex programming concept, it is…

  • Okay for an Adult to guide a Student through a flowchart to understand its logic.
  • Not okay for an Adult to write a premade command for that Student to copy / paste.

During Match play, it is…

  • Okay for an Adult to provide cheerful, positive encouragement as a spectator.
  • Not okay for an Adult to explicitly shout step-by-step commands from the audience.

This rule operates in tandem with the REC Foundation Student Centered Policy, which is available on the REC Foundation website for Teams to reference throughout the season:

https://viqc-kb.recf.org/hc/en-us/articles/9778591033879-Student-Centered-Policy

Violation Notes: Potential Violations of this rule will be reviewed on a case-by-case basis. By definition, all Violations of this rule become Score Affecting as soon as a Robot which was built by an Adult scores points in a Match.


<G3> Use common sense. When reading and applying the various rules in this document, please remember that common sense always applies in the VEX IQ Robotics Competition.

Some examples may include:

  • If there is an obvious typographical error (such as “per <T5>” instead of “per <G5>”), this does not mean that the error should be taken literally until corrected in a future update.
  • Understand the realities of the VEX IQ Robot construction system. For example, if a Robot could hover above the Field for a whole Match, that would create loopholes in many of the rules. But… they can’t. So… don’t worry about it.
  • When in doubt, if there is no rule prohibiting an action, it is generally legal. However, if you have to ask whether a given action would violate <S1>, <G1>, or <T1>, then that’s probably a good indication that it is outside the spirit of the competition.
  • In general, Teams will be given the “benefit of the doubt” in the case of accidental or edge-case rules infractions. However, there is a limit to this allowance, and repeated or strategic infractions will still be penalized.

<G4> The Robot must represent the skill level of the Team. Each Team must include Drivers, Programmer(s), Designer(s), and Builder(s). No Student may fulfill any of these roles for more than one VEX IQ Robotics Competition Team in a given competition season. Students may have more than one role on the Team, e.g. the Designer may also be the Builder, the Programmer and a Driver.

  1. Team members may move from one Team to another for non-strategic reasons outside of the Team’s control.
    1. Examples of permissible moves may include, but are not limited to, illness, changing schools, conflicts within a Team, or combining/splitting Teams.
    2. Examples of strategic moves in Violation of this rule may include, but are not limited to, one Programmer “switching” Teams in order to write the same program for multiple Robots, or one Student writing the Engineering Notebook for multiple Teams.
    3. If a Student leaves a Team to join another Team, <G4> still applies to the Students remaining on the previous Team. For example, if a Programmer leaves a Team, then that Team’s Robot must still represent the skill level of the Team without that Programmer. One way to accomplish this would be to ensure that the Programmer teaches or trains a “replacement” Programmer in their absence.
  2. When a Team qualifies for a Championship event (e.g., States, Nationals, Worlds, etc.) the Students on the Team attending the Championship event are expected to be the same Students on the Team that was awarded the spot. Students can be added as support to the Team, but may not be added as Drivers or Programmers for the Team.
  1. An exception is allowed if one (1) Driver and/or one (1) Programmer on the Team cannot attend the event. The Team can make a single substitution of a Driver or Programmer for the Championship event with another Student, even if that Student has competed on a different Team. This Student will now be on this new Team and may not substitute back to the original Team.

Violation Notes: Violations of this rule will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis, in tandem with the REC Foundation Student Centered Policy as noted in <G2>, and the REC Foundation Code of Conduct as noted in <G1>.

Event Partners should bear in mind <G3>, and use common sense when enforcing this rule. It is not the intent to punish a Team who may change Team members over the course of a season due to illness, changing schools, conflicts within a Team, etc.

Event Partners and referees are not expected to keep a roster of any Student who has ever been a Driver for one day. This rule is intended to block any instance of loaning or sharing Team members for the sole purpose of gaining a competitive advantage.


<G5> Robots begin the Match in the starting size. At the beginning of a Match, each Robot must fit within an 11” wide x 20” long x 15” high (279mm x 508mm x 381mm) volume, as checked during inspection per <R4>.

Violation Notes: Any Violation of this rule will result in the Robot being removed from the Field prior to the start of the Match; rules <R3d> and <T6> will apply until the situation is corrected. They will not receive a Disqualification, but they will not be permitted to play in the Match.


<G6>
Keep your Robot together. Robots may not intentionally detach parts or leave mechanisms on the Field during any Match. Parts that become unintentionally detached from the Robot are no longer considered to be part of the Robot and can be either left on the Field or collected by a Driver (utilizing <G10>).

Note: Adding or replacing mechanisms on a Robot mid-Match (e.g. during a <G10> interaction) is considered a Violation of the intent and spirit of this rule.


<G7> Don’t damage the Field. Robot interactions which damage the Field or any Field Elements are prohibited. For the purpose of this rule, “damage” is defined as anything which requires repair in order to begin the next Match, such as causing part of a Goal to detach from the Field.

Teams are responsible for the actions of their Robots at all times, especially when interacting with Goals and the Supply Zone. If a Team chooses to repeatedly ram full-speed into a Goal, it will be hard to convince a Head Referee that any damage caused was “accidental.”

Violation Notes:


<G8> Drivers drive your Robot, and stay in the Driver Station. During a Match, Robots may only be operated by that Team’s Drivers and/or software running on the Robot’s control system. Drivers must remain in their Driver Station, except when legally interacting with their Robot as per <G10>.

Drivers are prohibited from any of the following actions during a Match:

  1. Bringing/using any sort of communication devices into the Driver Station. Devices with communication features turned off (e.g., a phone in airplane mode) are allowed.
  2. Standing or sitting on any sort of object during a Match, regardless of whether the Field is on the floor or elevated.
  3. Materials used outside of the 1:00 Match time are permitted, provided that no other rules are violated. Examples could include a bin to help carry the Robot to the Field, or VEX IQ parts used to help align the Robot at the start of the Match.

Note: Drivers are the only Team members that are allowed to be in the Driver Station during a Match. Adults (other than event staff) are not permitted to be in the Driver Station during a Match.

Violation Notes: Major Violations of this rule are not required to be Score Affecting, and could invoke Violations of other rules, such as <G1>, <G2>, or <G11>.


<G9> Hands out of the Field. Drivers are prohibited from making intentional contact with any Field Element, Block, or Robot during a Match, except for the allowances in <G10>, <RSC5> and/or <SG3>.


<G10> Handling the Robot mid-match is allowed under certain circumstances. If a Robot goes completely outside the playing Field, gets stuck, tips over, or otherwise requires assistance, the Team’s Drivers may retrieve & reset the Robot. To do so, they must do the following:

  1. Signal the Referee by placing their VEX IQ Controller on the ground.
  2. Any Blocks being controlled by the Robot while being handled must be removed from the Field.
    1. In the context of this rule, “controlled” implies that the Robot was manipulating the Block, and not simply touching it. For example, if the Block moves with the Robot either vertically or while turning, then the Robot is “controlling” the Block.
  3. The Robot must be placed back into a legal position that meets the criteria listed in <SG1> (i.e., contacting the Field Perimeter, not contacting any Blocks, etc).

If the Drivers cannot reach the Robot due to the Robot being in the center of the Field, the Drivers may ask the Head Referee to pick up the Robot and hand it to the Drivers for placement according to the conditions above.

Violation Notes: This rule is intended to allow Teams to fix damaged Robots or help get their Robots “out of trouble.” Strategically exploiting this rule may be considered a Minor Violation or Major Violation at the Head Referee’s discretion.


<G11> A Team’s two Drivers switch Controllers midway through the Match. In a given Match, up to two (2) Drivers may be in the Driver Station per Team. The two Drivers must switch their controller between twenty-five seconds (0:25) and thirty-five seconds (0:35) remaining in the Match.

  1. No Driver shall operate a Robot for more than thirty-five seconds (0:35).
  2. The second Driver may not touch their Team’s controls until the controller is passed to him/her.
  3. Once the controller is passed, the first Driver may no longer touch their Team’s controls.

Note: If only one Driver is present (i.e., the Team has not exercised the allowance in <G4>), this rule still applies, and they must cease Robot operation after the first thirty-five (0:35) seconds of the Match.

Violation Notes: At a minimum, any Violation of this rule is considered a Minor Violation. Whether it escalates to a Major Violation or not is dependent upon the Head Referee’s judgment regarding:

Note: The 2024-2025 and 2025-2026 VIQRC games will include a third Drive Team member. This will be a non-Driver role that will focus on human "match load" interactions with Game Objects. More information will be available when the 2024-2025 VIQRC Game Manual is released in May 2024.

Specific Game Rules


<SG1> Pre-match setup.At the beginning of a Match, each Robot must meet the following criteria:

  1. Not contacting any Blocks, Goals or their supporting structure, Starting Pegs, or other Robots.
  2. Fit within an 11” wide x 20” long x 15” high (279mm x 508mm x 381mm) volume, as checked during inspection per <R3>.
  3. Contacting the inside and/or top face of the Field Perimeter wall that is between Goals I and II. See Figure 18.
  4. Have no motors or other mechanisms in motion or “running” until the Match begins. Pre-charging a pneumatic system (i.e., having the Pneumatic Pump running prior to the Match) is the only permitted exception to this rule.

Figure 18: Robots in a legal pre-Match starting position.

Violation Notes: Any Violation of this rule will result in the Robot being removed from the Field prior to the start of the Match; rules <R3d> and <T6> will apply until the situation is corrected. They will not receive a Disqualification, but they will not be permitted to play in the Match.

Note: There are no specific starting positions, as long as the above criteria are met. Head Referees may ask Teams to temporarily move their Robot between two of the black lines on the Field for a size check, but there is no requirement for them to start the Match in that location once the size has been verified.


<SG2> Horizontal expansion is limited during a Match. Robots may not expand horizontally beyond the 11” x 20” starting dimension limit at any time during a Match.

Note: There are no restrictions on vertical expansion.


Figure 19: Examples of how a Robot should be measured horizontally


<SG3> Keep Blocks in the Field. Blocks that leave the Field during a Match may be returned to the Supply Zone by a Driver or Referee

  1. “Leaving the Field” means that a Block is outside of the Field Perimeter and no longer in contact with the Field, Field Elements, other Blocks, or Robots. If Blocks are removed from a Robot during a <G10> interaction, these Blocks are considered “out of the Field” as soon as they are no longer in contact with any Robots.
  2. Blocks may not be placed in contact with any Robots
  3. Moving or disturbing other Blocks during this action may be considered a Violation of rule <G9>. If a Block is unable to be returned without disturbing other Blocks, it should remain outside of the Field until it can be legally placed.
  4. Any Blocks which remain outside of the Field at the end of a Match will be considered “in” the Supply Zone (i.e., the Supply Zone will not be eligible to be Cleared).

Note: If a Block is unable to be returned to the Supply Zone without disturbing or moving other Blocks, it may remain outside of the Field.

If a Block is on its way out of the Field (as determined by the Head Referee), but is deflected back into the field by a Driver, field monitor, ceiling/wall, or other external factor, <SG3> would still apply. This Block should be considered “out of the Field” and removed or returned to the Supply Zone by a Head Referee. If the redirection occurred due to contact with a Driver, it will be at the Head Referee’s discretion whether <G9> or <SG3> should apply.


<SG4> Blocks are randomly loaded in the Supply Zone. Prior to each Match, the Supply Zone will be filled randomly with eight (8) Purple Blocks and twenty-three (23) Green Blocks.

  1. Blocks will be randomly mixed by a field reset volunteer and/or the Head Referee.
  2. Blocks must be placed such that one face of each Block is “flat” on the Floor (i.e. not “stacked” or “tilted’). See images throughout this Game Manual for examples.
  3. Team members may not touch Blocks in the Supply Zone during pre-Match setup. Any contact will result in a re-randomization of the Supply Zone by the Head Referee.

Section 2


The Robot


Description


Every Robot must pass a full inspection before being cleared to participate in the VEX IQ Robotics Competition. This inspection will ensure that all Robot rules and regulations are met. Initial inspections will typically take place during team check-in / practice time. Every Team should use the rules below as a guide to pre-inspect their Robot and ensure that it meets all requirements.


Inspection Rules


<R1> One Robot per Team. Only one (1) Robot will be allowed to participate per Team at a given event. Though it is expected that Teams will make changes to their Robots at the event, a Team is limited to only one (1) Robot, and a given Robot may only be used by (1) Team. The VEX IQ system is intended to be a mobile robotics design platform. As such, a VEX IQ Robotics Competition Robot, for the purposes of the VEX IQ Robotics Competition, has the following subsystems:

  • Subsystem 1: Mobile robotic base including wheels, tracks, or any other mechanism that allows the Robot to navigate the majority of the flat playing Field surface. For a stationary Robot, the robotic base without wheels would be considered Subsystem 1.
  • Subsystem 2: Power and control system that includes a VEX IQ legal battery, a VEX IQ control system, and associated Smart Motors for the mobile robotic base.
  • Subsystem 3: Additional mechanisms (and associated Smart Motors) that allow manipulation of Blocks or navigation/manipulation of Field Elements.

Given the above definitions, a minimum Robot for use in any VEX IQ Robotics Competition event (including Skills Challenges) must consist of subsystems 1 and 2 above. Thus, if you are swapping out an entire subsystem 1 or 2, you have now created a second Robot and are no longer legal.

  • Teams may not compete with one Robot while a second is being modified or assembled at a competition.
  • Teams may not have an assembled second Robot on hand at a competition that is used to repair or swap parts with the first Robot.
  • Teams may not switch back and forth between multiple Robots during a competition. This includes using different Robots for Skills Challenge, Qualification Matches, and/or Finals Matches.
  • Multiple Teams may not use the same Robot. Once a Robot has competed under a given Team number at an event, it is “their” Robot; no other Teams may compete with it for the duration of the competition season.

The intent of <R1a>, <R1b>, and <R1c> is to ensure an unambiguous level playing field for all Teams. Teams are welcome (and encouraged) to improve or modify their Robots between events, or to collaborate with other Teams to develop the best possible game solution.

However, a Team who brings and/or competes with two separate Robots at the same tournament has diminished the efforts of a Team who spent extra design time making sure that their one Robot can accomplish all of the game’s tasks. A multi-Team organization that shares a single Robot has diminished the efforts of a multi-Team organization that puts in the time, effort, and resources to undergo separate individual design processes and develop their own Robots.

To help determine whether a Robot is a “separate Robot” or not, use the Subsystem definitions found in <R1>. Above that, use common sense as referenced in<G3>. If you can place two complete and legal Robots on a table next to each other, then they are two separate Robots. Trying to decide if changing a pin, a wheel, or a motor constitutes a separate Robot is missing the intent and spirit of this rule.


<R2> Robots must represent the Team’s skill level. The Robot must be designed, built, and programmed by members of the Team. Adults are permitted to mentor and teach design, building, and programming skills to the Students on the Team, but may not design, build, or program that Team’s Robot.

In VIQRC, we expect Adults to teach fundamental Robot principles like linkages, drivetrains, and manipulators, then allow the Students to determine which designs to implement and build on their Robot.

Similarly, Adults are encouraged to teach the Students how to code various functions involving applicable sensors and mechanisms, then have the Students program the Robot from what they have learned.


<R3> Robots must pass inspection. The Team’s Robot must pass inspection before being allowed to participate in any Matches. Noncompliance with any Robot design or construction rule will result in removal from Matches or Disqualification of the Robot at an event until the Robot is brought back into compliance, as described in the following subclauses.

  1. Significant changes to a Robot, such as a partial or full swap of Subsystem 3, must be re-inspected before the Robot may compete again.
  2. All possible functional Robot configurations must be inspected before being used in competition.
  3. Teams may be asked to submit to random spot inspections by Head Referees. Refusal to submit will result in Disqualification.
    1. If a Robot is determined to not be legal before a Match begins, the Robot will be removed from the Field. A Driver may remain so that the Team does not get assessed a “no-show” (per <T5>).
  4. Robots which have not passed inspection (i.e., that are in Violation of one or more Robot rules) will not be permitted to play in any Matches until they have done so. <T6> will apply to any Matches that occur until the Robot has passed inspection.
  5. If a Robot has passed inspection, but is later found to be in Violation of a Robot rule during or immediately following a Match, then they will be Disqualified from that Match and <R3d> / <T6> will apply until the Violation is remedied and the Team is re-inspected.
  6. All inspection rules are to be enforced at the discretion of the Head Referee within a given event. Robot legality at one event does not automatically imply legality at future events. Robots which rely on “edge-case” interpretations of subjective rules, such as whether a decoration is “non-functional” or not, should expect additional scrutiny during inspection.

<R4> Starting configuration. At the start of each Match, the Robot must be able to satisfy the following constraints:

  1. Only be contacting the Floor and the Field Perimeter.
  2. Fit within an 11” x 20” x 15” (279.4mm x 508mm x 381.0mm) volume.
  3. The starting configuration of the Robot at the beginning of a Match must be the same as a Robot configuration inspected for compliance, and within the maximum allowed size.
    1. Teams using more than one possible Robot configuration at the beginning of Matches must tell the Inspector(s) and have the Robot inspected in its largest configuration(s).
    2. A Team may NOT have its Robot inspected in one configuration and then place it in an uninspected configuration at the start of a Match.

Figure 20: The approximate starting size that a Robot should start the Match in.


<R5> Prohibited items. The following types of mechanisms and components are NOT allowed:

  1. Those that could potentially damage Field Elements or Blocks.
  2. Those that could potentially damage or entangle other Robots.

<R6> VEX IQ product line. Robots may be built ONLY from official Robot components from the VEX IQ product line, unless otherwise specifically noted within these rules.

  1. Official VEX IQ products are ONLY available from VEX Robotics. To determine whether a product is “official” or not, consult www.vexiq.com.
  2. If an Inspector or event official questions whether something is an official VEX IQ component, the Team will be required to provide documentation to an inspector that proves the component’s source. Such documentation may include receipts, part numbers, or other printed documentation.
  3. Only VEX IQ components specifically designed for use in Robot construction are allowed. Using additional components outside their typical purpose is against the intent of the rule (i.e., please don’t try using VEX IQ apparel, Team or event support materials, packaging, Field Elements, or other non-Robot products on a VEX IQ Robotics Competition Robot).
  4. Products from the VEX V5, VEX CTE, VEX EXP, Cortex, or VEXpro product lines cannot be used for Robot construction. However, products from the VEX V5 product line that are also cross-listed as part of the VEX IQ product line are legal. A “cross-listed” product is one which can be found in both the VEX IQ and VEX V5 sections of the VEX Robotics website.
  5. Mechanical/structural components from the VEX Robotics by HEXBUG* product line are legal for Robot construction. However, electrical components from the VEX Robotics by HEXBUG product line are illegal for Robot construction.
  6. Mechanical/structural components from the VEX GO product line are legal for Robot construction. However, electrical components from the VEX GO product line are illegal for Robot construction.
  7. Official Robotics components from the VEX IQ product line that have been discontinued are still legal for Robot use. However, Teams must be aware of <R6b>.
  8. Functional 3D printed components, such as replicas of legal VEX IQ parts or custom designs, are not legal for Robot use.
  9. Additional VEX IQ products that are released during the season are legal for use, unless otherwise noted on their product pages and/or in the VEX IQ Robotics Competition Legal Parts Appendix.
  10. VEX IQ Smart Cables may only be used for connecting legal electronic devices to the VEX IQ Robot Brain.


Note: A comprehensive list of legal parts can be found in the VEX IQ Robotics Competition Legal Parts Appendix, at https://www.vexrobotics.com/iq/competition/viqc-current-game. This Appendix is updated as needed if/when new VEX IQ parts are released, and may not coincide with scheduled Game Manual updates.

* The HEXBUG brand is a registered trademark belonging to Spin Master Corp


<R7> Non-VEX IQ components. Robots are allowed to use the following additional “non-VEX IQ” components:

  1. Rubber bands that are identical in length and thickness to those included in the VEX IQ product line (#32, #64 & #117B).
  2. ⅛” metal shafts from the VEX V5 product line.

<R8> Decorations are allowed. Teams may add non-functional decorations, provided that they do not affect Robot performance in any significant way or affect the outcome of the Match. These decorations must be in the spirit of the competition. Inspectors will have final say in what is considered “non-functional.” Unless otherwise specified below, non-functional decorations are governed by all standard Robot rules.

  1. Decorations must be in the spirit of an educational competition.
  2. To be considered “non-functional,” any decorations must be backed by legal materials that provide the same functionality. For example, a giant decal cannot be used to prevent Blocks from falling out of the Robot unless it is backed by VEX IQ material. A simple way to check this is to determine if removing the decoration would impact the performance of the Robot in any way.
  3. The use of non-toxic paint is considered a legal non-functional decoration. However, any paint being used as an adhesive or to impact how tightly parts fit together would be classified as functional.

Teams should be mindful of any non-functional decorations which could risk “distracting” Alliance partner Robots’ Vision Sensor or other sensors.


<R9> Officially registered Team numbers must be displayed on Robot License Plates. To participate in an official VEX IQ Robotics Competition Event, a Team must first register on robotevents.com and receive a VEX IQ Robotics Competition Team Number.

This Team number must be legibly displayed on at least one (1) VEX IQ Robotics Competition License Plate. Teams may choose to use the official VEX IQ Robotics Competition License Plate (VEX Part Number 228-7401), or may create their own custom License Plates.

  1. License Plates must fulfill all inspection rules.
  2. License Plates must be clearly visible at all times. For example, License Plates must not be in a position that would be easily obstructed by a Robot mechanism during standard Match play.
  3. Any custom-made License Plates used must be the same length and height as the official License Plate (3.5” x 1.5” [88.9mm x 38.1mm]). They must not exceed the width of the official License Plate (0.25” [6.35mm]).
  4. Custom-made License Plates are considered non-functional decorations, and must therefore meet all of the criteria listed in <R8>. Therefore, 3D printed License Plates are permitted within these rules.

Figure 21: A VEX IQ Robotics Competition License Plate with a VEX IQ Robotics Competition Team Number written upon it.

Figure 22: An example of a legal custom License Plate.



<R10> Let it go after the Match is over. Robots must be designed to permit easy removal of Blocks from their Robot without requiring that the Robot have power or remote control after the Match is over.


<R11> Robot Brain. Robots are limited to one (1) VEX IQ Robot Brain.

  1. Robot Brains, microcontrollers, and other electronic components that are part of the VEX Robotics by HEXBUG, VEX GO, VEX EXP, VEX V5, VEX 123, or VEXpro product lines are not allowed.
    1. The Robot AA Battery Holder (228-3493) is the only exception to this rule, per <R13>.
  2. If using a first generation VEX IQ Brain, Robots must use one (1) VEX IQ 900 MHz radio, VEX IQ 2.4 GHz radio, or VEX IQ Smart Radio in conjunction with their VEX IQ Robot Brain.
  3. The only legal method of driving the Robot during Teamwork Challenge Matches and Driving Skills Matches is the VEX IQ Controller.
  4. See <RSC5> and <RSC6> for more information about operating the Robot during Autonomous Coding Skills Matches.

<R12> Motors. Robots may use up to six (6) VEX IQ Smart Motors.

  1. Additional motors cannot be used on the Robot (even motors that aren’t connected).

<R13> Batteries. The only allowable sources of electrical power for a VEX IQ Robotics Competition Robot are one (1) VEX IQ Robot Battery (first or second generation) or six (6) AA batteries via the Robot AA Battery Holder (228-3493).

  1. Additional batteries cannot be used on the Robot (even batteries that aren’t connected).
  2. Teams are permitted to have an external power source (such as a rechargeable battery pack) plugged into their VEX IQ Controller during a Match, provided that this power source is connected safely and does not violate any other rules (such as <G8>).

Note: Although it is legal, the Robot AA Battery Holder (228-3493) is not recommended for use in the VEX IQ Robotics Competition.


<R14> Firmware. Teams must have their VEX IQ firmware (VEXos) up to date. Teams can download the latest version of VEXos at www.vexiq.com/vexos.


<R15> Modifications of parts. Parts may NOT be modified unless specifically listed as an exception in this rule. Examples of modifications include, but are not limited to, bending, cutting, sanding, gluing, or melting. The following exceptions are legal:

  1. Cutting metal VEX IQ or VEX V5 shafts to custom lengths.
  2. Bending parts which are intended to be flexible, such as string, rubber bands, or thin plastic sheets.
  3. Cutting VEX IQ pneumatic tubing to custom lengths.

<R16> Pneumatics. Robots using parts from the VEX IQ Pneumatics Kit (228-8795) must satisfy the following criteria:

  1. No more than two (2) Air Tanks, including any that aren’t connected.
  2. No more than (1) Pneumatic Pump, including any that aren’t connected.
  3. No additional parts that are not included in the VEX IQ Pneumatics Kit (e.g., unofficial tubing or fittings).

Note: There is no limit on the number of Pneumatic Cylinders or Pneumatic Control Units that may be used, provided that no other rules are violated. There are no restrictions on running the Pneumatic Pump prior to (or during) Matches.


The intent of <R16a> is to limit Robots to the air pressure stored in two Air Tanks, as well as the normal working air pressure contained in any Pneumatic Cylinders and tubing on the Robot. Teams may not use other elements for the purposes of storing or generating air pressure. allianceUsing Pneumatic Cylinders or additional tubing solely for additional air storage is in Violation of the spirit of this rule. Similarly, using Pneumatic Cylinders and/or tubing without an actual pneumatic system (e.g., Air Tanks and/or a Pneumatic Pump) is also in Violation of the spirit of this rule.

Section 3


The Event


Description


The VEX IQ Robotics Competition encompasses both the Teamwork Challenge and the Robot Skills Challenge. This section determines how the Teamwork Challenge and Robot Skills Challenge are to be played at a given event. For information about the requirements for tournaments that qualify teams to championship events, visit this article in the REC Library.

Awards may be given to top Teams in each format, as applicable. Awards may also be given for overall performance in the judged criteria. Please review the Guide to Judging: Awards article in the REC Library for more details.


Tournament Definitions


Event Partner – The volunteer VEX IQ Robotics Competition tournament coordinator who serves as an overall manager for the volunteers, venue, event materials, and all other event considerations. Event Partners serve as the official liaison between the REC Foundation, the event volunteers, and event attendees.


Finals Match – A Teamwork Match used to determine the Teamwork Challenge champions.


Head Referee – A certified impartial volunteer responsible for enforcing the rules in this manual as written. Head Referees are the only people who may discuss ruling interpretations or scoring questions with Teams at an event.


Match Stop Time – The time remaining (i.e., displayed on the timer or audience display) in a tiebreaker Finals Match when an Alliance ends the Match early by placing their controllers on the ground. The Match Stop Time is rounded down to the nearest even number. For example, if controllers are set down when the displayed time is 13 seconds, the Match Stop Time is recorded as 12 seconds. If an Alliance does not finish the Match early, they receive a default Match Stop Time of 0 seconds.


Practice Match – A non-scored Match used to provide time for Teams to get acquainted with the official playing Field.


Qualification Match – A Teamwork Match used to determine the event rankings.


Robot Skills Challenge – A portion of the VEX IQ Robotics Competition. The Robot Skills Challenge consists of Driving Skills Matches and Autonomous Coding Skills Matches as described in the General Definitions.


Scorekeeper Referee – An impartial volunteer responsible for tallying scores at the end of a Match. Scorekeeper Referees do not make ruling interpretations, and should redirect any Team questions regarding rules or scores to the Head Referee.


Teamwork Challenge – A portion of the VEX IQ Robotics Competition. The Teamwork Challenge consists of Teamwork Matches. The Teamwork Challenge includes Qualification Matches and Finals Matches, and may include Practice Matches.


Tournament Rules


<T1> The Head Referee has ultimate and final authority on all gameplay ruling decisions during the competition.

  1. Scorekeeper Referees score the Match, and may serve as observers or advisers for the Head Referees, but may not determine any rules or infractions directly.
  2. When issuing a Disqualification or warning to a Team, the Head Referee must provide the rule number of the specific rule that has been Violated, and record the Violation in the Match Anomaly Log.
  3. Violations of the REC Foundation Code of Conduct may involve additional escalation beyond the Head Referee’s initial ruling, including (but not limited to) investigation by an REC Foundation representative. Rules <S1>, <G1>, and <G2> are the only rules for which this escalation may be required.
  4. Event Partners may not overrule a Head Referee’s decision.
  5. Every Qualification Match & Finals Match must be watched by a Head Referee. Head Referees may only watch one Match at a time; if multiple Matches are happening simultaneously on separate fields, each field must have its own Head Referee.

Note from the VEX GDC: The rules contained in this Game Manual are written to be enforced by human Head Referees. Many rules have “black-and-white” criteria that can be easily checked. However, some rulings will rely on a judgment call from this human Head Referee. In these cases, Head Referees will make their calls based on what they and the Scorekeeper Referees saw, what guidance is provided by their official support materials (the Game Manual and the Q&A), and most crucially, the context of the Match in question.

The VEX IQ Robotics Competition does not have video replay, our Fields do not have absolute sensors to count scores, and most events do not have the resources for an extensive review conference between each Match.

When an ambiguous rule results in a controversial call, there is a natural instinct to wonder what the “right” ruling “should have been,” or what the GDC “would have ruled.” This is ultimately an irrelevant question; our answer is that when a rule specifies “Head Referee’s discretion” (or similar), then the “right” call is the one made by the Head Referee in the moment. The VEX GDC designs games, and writes rules, with this expectation (constraint) in mind.


<T2> Head Referees must be qualified. VEX IQ Head Referees must have the following qualifications:

  1. Be at least 16 years of age.
  2. Be approved by the Event Partner.
  3. Be an REC Foundation Certified VIQRC Head Referee for the current season.

Note: Scorekeeper Referees must be at least 15 years of age, and must be approved by the Event Partner.


<T3> The Drivers are permitted to immediately appeal the Head Referee’s ruling. If Drivers wish to dispute a score or ruling, they must stay in the Driver Station until the Head Referee talks with them. The Head Referee may choose to meet with the Drivers at another location and/or at a later time so that the Head Referee has time to reference materials or resources to help with the decision. Once the Head Referee announces that their decision has been made final, the issue is over and no more appeals may be made (See rule <T1>).

  1. Head Referees may not review any photo or video Match recordings when determining a score or ruling.
  2. Head Referees are the only individuals permitted to explain a rule, Disqualification, or warning to the Teams. Teams should never consult other field personnel, including Scorekeeper Referees, regarding a ruling clarification.

Communication and conflict resolution skills are an important life skill for Students to practice and learn. In VEX IQ Robotics Competitions, we expect Students to practice proper conflict resolution using the proper chain of command. Violations of this rule may be considered a Violation of <G1> and/or the Code of Conduct.

Some events may choose to utilize a “question box” or other designated location for discussions with Head Referees. Offering a “question box” is within the discretion of the Event Partner and/or Head Referee, and may act as an alternate option for asking Drivers to remain in the Driver Station (although all other aspects of this rule apply).

However, by using this alternate location, Drivers acknowledge that they are forfeiting the opportunity to use any contextual information involving the specific state of the Field at the end of the Match. For example, it is impossible to appeal whether a game element was Scored or not if the Field has already been reset. If this information is pertinent to the appeal, Drivers should still remain in the Driver Station, and relocate to the “question box” once the Head Referee has been made aware of the concern and/or any relevant context.


<T4> The Event Partner has ultimate authority regarding all non-gameplay decisions during an event. The Game Manual is intended to provide a set of rules for successfully playing VIQRC Full Volume; it is not intended to be an exhaustive compilation of guidelines for running a VEX Robotics Competition event. Rules such as, but not limited to, the following examples are at the discretion of the Event Partner and should be treated with the same respect as the Game Manual:

  • Venue access
  • Pit spaces
  • Health and safety
  • Team registration and/or competition eligibility
  • Team conduct away from competition fields

<T5> Be at your match on time. If no member of a Team is present in the Driver Station at the start of a Match, that Team is considered a “no show” and will receive zero (0) points. The other Team in the Alliance will still play and receive points for the Match.


<T6> Robots at the field must be ready to play. If a Team brings their Robot to the Field, it must be prepared to play (i.e., batteries charged, sized within the starting size constraint, etc.)

  1. Robots must be placed on the field promptly. Repeated failure to do so could result in a Violation of <G1> and/or removal of the Robot from the current Match at the Head Referee’s discretion.

<T7> Match Replays are allowed, but rare. Match replays (i.e., playing a Match over again from its start) are at the discretion of the Event Partner and Head Referee, and will only be issued in the most extreme circumstances. Some examples that may warrant a Match replay are as follows:

  1. Score Affecting “Field fault” issues.
    1. Blocks not starting in the correct positions.
    2. Field Elements detaching or moving beyond normal tolerances, not a result of Robot interactions.
  2. Score Affecting game rule issues.
    1. A Field is reset before the score is determined.

<T8> Disqualifications. A Team that is issued a Disqualification in a Qualification Match receives zero (0) points for the Match. The other Team on their Alliance will still receive points for the Match.

  1. In Finals Matches, Disqualifications apply to the whole Alliance, not just one Team. An Alliance that receives a Disqualification in a Finals Match will receive zero (0) points.
  2. A Team that receives a Disqualification in a Robot Skills Match will receive a score of zero (0).

<T9> Timeouts. There are no timeouts in Qualification Matches or Finals Matches.


<T10> Be prepared for minor field variance. Field Element tolerances may vary from nominal by up to ±1.0”, unless otherwise specified. Block weights may vary from nominal by up to ±2 grams. Teams are encouraged to design their Robots accordingly. Please make sure to check Appendix A for more specific nominal dimensions and tolerances.


<T11> Fields and Field Elements may be repaired at the Event Partner’s discretion. All competition fields and other Field Elements at an event must be set up in accordance with the specifications in Appendix A and / or other applicable support materials. Minor aesthetic customizations or repairs are permitted, provided that they do not impact gameplay (see <T4>).

Examples of permissible modifications include, but are not limited to:

  • Replacing a damaged or missing VEX IQ Field component with an identical part of any color
  • Elevating the playing field off of the Floor (common heights are 10” to 24” [25.4cm to 61cm])
  • Using off-the-shelf PVC to replace a damaged or missing Supply Zone pipe
  • Removing the green and purple 0x2 pins that are used to help with field reset

<T12> Teamwork Matches. During Teamwork Challenge Matches, two (2) Teams form an Alliance that will play on the Field.

  1. Qualification Match Alliances are randomly selected.
  2. Finals Match Alliances are assigned as follows:
    1. The first and second ranked Teams form an Alliance.
    2. The third and fourth ranked Teams form an Alliance.
    3. And so on, until all Teams participating in Finals Matches have formed an Alliance.

<T13> Ending a Match early. If an Alliance wants to end a Qualification Match or a Finals Match early, both Teams must signal the referee by ceasing all Robot motion and placing their controllers on the ground. The referee will then signal to the Teams that the Match is over and will begin to tally the score. If the Match is a tiebreaker Finals Match, then the Match Stop Time will also be recorded.


<T14> Practice Matches may be played at some events, but are not required. If Practice Matches are run, every effort will be made to equalize practice time for all Teams.


<T15> Qualification Matches will occur according to the official match schedule. This schedule will indicate Alliance partners, Qualification Match times, and, if the event has multiple Fields, which Field each Qualification Match will be played on.

Note: The official Match schedule is subject to changes at the Event Partner’s discretion.


<T16> Each Team will be scheduled Qualification Matches as follows.

  1. When in a tournament, the tournament must have a minimum of six (6) Qualification Matches per team at local qualifying events and eight (8) for a Championship event.
  2. When in a league, there must be at least three (3) league ranking sessions, with at least one (1) week between sessions. Each session must have a minimum of two (2) Qualification Matches per Team. The suggested number of Qualification Matches per Team for a standard league ranking session is four (4). Event Partners may choose to have Qualification Matches as part of their league finals session.

<T17> Teams are ranked by their average Qualification Match scores.

  1. When in a tournament, every Team will be ranked based on the same number of Qualification Matches.
    1. For tournaments that have more than 1 division, Teams will be ranked among all Teams in their specific division. Each division will have its own Finals Matches. The winners of each division will then have an overall event Finals. Any multi-division event must be approved by the REC Foundation EEM/RSM prior to the event, and divisions must be assigned in sequential order by Team number.
  2. When in a league, every Team will be ranked based on the number of Matches played. Teams that participate in less than 60% of the total Matches available will be ranked below Teams that participate in at least 60% of the total Matches available (e.g., if the league offers 3 ranking sessions with 4 Qualification Matches per Team, Teams that participate in 8 or more Matches will be ranked higher than Teams who participate in 7 or fewer Matches). Being a no-show to a Match that a Team is scheduled in still constitutes participation for these calculations.
  3. A certain number of a Team’s lowest Qualification Match scores will be excluded from the rankings based on the quantity of Qualification Matches each Team plays. Excluded scores do not affect participation for leagues.

    Number of Qualification Matches per Team

    Number of excluded Match scores

    Between four (4) and seven (7)

    1

    Between eight (8) and eleven (11)

    2

    Between twelve (12) and fifteen (15)

    3

    Sixteen (16) or more

    4

  4. In some cases, a Team will be asked to play an additional Qualification Match. The extra Match will be identified on the Match Schedule with an asterisk and will not impact the Team’s ranking (or participation for leagues). Teams are reminded that <G1>s is always in effect and Teams are expected to behave as if the additional Qualification Match counted.
  5. Ties in Team ranking are broken by:
    1. Removing the Team’s lowest score and comparing the new average score.
    2. Removing the Team’s next lowest score and comparing the new average score (on through all scores).
    3. If the Teams are still tied, the Teams will be sorted by random electronic draw.

<T18> Teams playing in Finals Matches. The number of Finals Matches, and therefore the number of Teams who will participate in Finals Matches, is determined by the Event Partner. Events that qualify teams directly to VEX Worlds must have a minimum of five (5) Finals Matches if there are ten (10) or more Teams in attendance.


<T19> Finals Match Schedule. Finals Matches are played sequentially, starting with the lowest-ranked Alliance. Each Alliance will participate in one (1) Finals Match. The Alliance with the highest Finals Match score is the Teamwork Challenge champion.

  1. Alliances are ranked by their Finals Match score. The highest-scoring Alliance is in first place, the second-highest-scoring Alliance is in second place, etc.
  2. Ties for first place will result in a series of tiebreaker Finals Matches, starting with the lower-seeded Alliance. The Alliance with the highest tiebreaker Finals Match score will be declared the Teamwork Challenge champion.
    1. If the tiebreaker Finals Match scores are tied, the Alliance with the higher Match Stop Time will be declared the winner.
    2. If the Match Stop Time is also tied, a second series of tiebreaker Finals Matches will be played. If this second series of tiebreaker Finals Match is also tied, then the higher-seeded Alliance will be declared the winner.
    3. If there is a tie for a place other than first, the higher-seeded Alliance will receive the higher rank.

Example 1: Alliance 6 and Alliance 3 are tied for first place. During the tiebreaker Finals Match, Alliance 6 scores 13 points and has a Match Stop Time of 12 seconds. Alliance 3 scores 13 points and has a Match Stop Time of 10 seconds. Alliance 6 is the Teamwork Challenge winner.

Example 2: Alliance 4 and Alliance 5 are tied for third place. Alliance 4 is the third place winner and Alliance 5 is the fourth place winner. In this way, the lower ranked Alliance must “overcome” the higher ranked Alliance in order to become the Teamwork Challenge champion.

Appendix A - Field Overview and Specifications

Appendix B - Robot Skills Challenge


Overview


In this challenge, Teams will compete in sixty-second (1:00) Matches in an effort to score as many points as possible. These Matches consist of Driving Skills Matches, which are entirely driver controlled, and Autonomous Coding Skills Matches, which are autonomous with limited human interaction. Teams will be ranked based on their combined score in the two types of Robot Skills Matches.


Robot Skills Challenge at a Standard Qualifying Tournament

  • The Robot Skills Challenge is an optional event for all Teams. Teams who do not compete will not be penalized in the Teamwork Challenge portion of the tournament. However, participation in the Robot Skills Challenge may impact eligibility for judged awards at the event.
  • Teams may play Robot Skills Matches on a “first come, first served” basis, or by a pre-scheduled method determined by the Event Partner.
  • Teams will be given the opportunity to play exactly three (3) Autonomous Coding Skills Matches and three (3) Driving Skills Matches. Teams should be aware of when the Robot Skills fields are open so that they do not miss their opportunity, (e.g., if a Team waits until five minutes before the Robot Skills fields close, then they have not used the opportunity given to them and will not be able to compete in all six matches).
  • Further details regarding Skills-Only Event logistics can be found in the REC Foundation Qualification Criteria document.

Robot Skills Challenge Definitions


All definitions from “The Game” section of the manual apply to the Robot Skills Challenge, unless otherwise specified.


Driving Skills Match – A Driving Skills Match consists of a sixty-second (1:00) Driver Controlled Period.

There is no Autonomous Period. Teams can elect to end a Driving Skills Match early if they wish to record a Skills Stop Time.


Autonomous Coding Skills Match – An Autonomous Coding Skills Match consists of a sixty-second (1:00) Autonomous Period. There is no Driver Controlled Period. Teams can elect to end an Autonomous Coding Skills Match early if they wish to record a Skills Stop Time.


Robot Skills Match – A Driving Skills Match or Autonomous Coding Skills Match.


Skills Stop Time – The time remaining in a Robot Skills Match when a Team ends the Match early.

  1. If a Team does not end the Match early, they receive a default Skills Stop Time of 0.
  2. The moment when the Match ends early is defined as the moment when the Robot and Blocks have come to a rest and the Driver provides the agreed upon visual and audio signal to the Referee. See <RSC7> for more details.
  3. If a Tournament Manager display is being used for field control, then the Skills Stop Time is the time shown on the display when the Match is ended early (i.e., in 1-second increments).
  4. If a manual timer is being used that counts down to 0 with greater accuracy than 1-second increments, then the time shown on the timer should be rounded up to the nearest second. For example, if the Robot is disabled and the timer shows 25.2 seconds, then the Skills Stop Time should be recorded as 26.

Robot Skills Challenge Rules


<RSC1> Standard rules apply in most cases. All rules and scoring from previous sections apply to the Robot Skills Matches, unless otherwise specified.

  1. There is no Double Parked bonus for Robot Skills Matches.

<RSC2> Skills Scoring and Ranking at events. For each Robot Skills Match, Teams are awarded a score based on the standard rules and scoring rules. Teams will be ranked based on the following scores and tiebreakers:

  1. Sum of highest Autonomous Coding Skills Match score and highest Driving Skills Match Score.
  2. Highest Autonomous Coding Skills Match score.
  3. Second-highest Autonomous Coding Skills Match score.
  4. Second-highest Driving Skills Match score.
  5. Highest sum of Skills Stop Times from a Team’s highest Autonomous Coding Skills Match and highest Driving Skills Match (i.e., the Matches in point 1).
  6. Highest Skills Stop Time from a Team’s highest Autonomous Coding Skills Match (i.e., the Match in point 2).
  7. Third-highest Autonomous Coding Skills Match score
  8. Third-highest Driving Skills Match score.
  9. If the tie cannot be broken after all above criteria (i.e., both Teams have the exact same scores and Skills Stop Times for each Autonomous Coding Skills Match and Driving Skills Match), then the following ordered criteria will be used to determine which team had the “best” Autonomous Coding Skills Match:
    1. Points for Blocks Scored in Goals
    2. Points for Height Bonus
    3. Points for Uniform Goals
  10. If the tie still cannot be broken, the same process in the step above will be applied to the Teams’ highest Driving Skills Matches.
  11. If the tie still isn’t broken, the Event Partner may choose to allow Teams to have one more deciding Match, or both Teams may be declared the winner.

<RSC3> Skills Rankings Globally. Teams are ranked based on their Robot Skills Match scores globally using the following tiebreakers.

  1. Highest Robot Skills score (combined Autonomous Coding Skills Match and Driving Skills Match Score from a single event).
  2. Highest Autonomous Coding Skills Match score (from any event).
  3. Highest sum of Skills Stop Times from the Robot Skills Matches used for point 1.
  4. Highest Skills Stop Time from the Autonomous Coding Skills Match used for point 2.
  5. Highest Driving Skills Match score (from any event).
  6. Highest Skills Stop Time from the Driving Skills Match score used in point 5.
  7. Earliest posting of the highest Autonomous Coding Skills Match score.
    1. The first Team to post a score ranks ahead of other Teams that post the same score at a later time, all else being equal.
  8. Earliest posting of the highest Driving Skills Match score.
    1. The first Team to post a score ranks ahead of other Teams that post the same score at a later time, all else being equal.

<RSC4> Skills Match Schedule. Teams play Robot Skills Matches on a first-come, first-served basis. Each Team will get the opportunity to play exactly three (3) Driving Skills Matches and three (3) Autonomous Coding Skills Matches.

Teams should review the event agenda and their Match schedule to determine when the best possible time is to complete their Robot Skills Matches. If the Robot Skills Challenge area closes before a Team has completed all six (6) Robot Skills Matches, but it is determined that there was adequate time given, then the Team will automatically forfeit those unused Matches.


<RSC5> Handling Robots during an Autonomous Coding Skills Match. A Team may handle their Robot as many times as desired during an Autonomous Coding Skills Match.

  1. Upon handling the Robot, it must be immediately brought back to any legal Starting Position.
    1. Drivers may reset or adjust the Robot as desired from this position, including pressing buttons on the Robot Brain or activating sensors.
  2. Any Blocks being controlled by the Robot while being handled must be removed from the Field, and can be returned to the Supply Zone by a referee or Driver. “Controlled” requires that the Robot was manipulating the Block and not simply touching it (e.g., if the Block moves with the Robot either vertically or while turning, the Robot is controlling the Block).
  3. Any Blocks within the chosen Starting Position for a reset must be removed from the Field and can be returned to the Supply Zone by a referee or Driver.
  4. During an Autonomous Coding Skills Match, Drivers may move freely around the Field, and are not restricted to the Driver Station when not handling their Robot.
    1. The rest of <G8>, which states that Drivers are not allowed to use any communication devices during their Match, still applies.
    2. An intent of this exception is to permit Drivers who wish to “stage” Robot handling during an Autonomous Coding Skills Match to do so without excessive running back and forth to the Driver Station.

Note: This rule only applies to Autonomous Coding Skills Matches. Driving Skills Matches are still governed by <G9> & <G10>, especially for strategic violations.

Note 2: Any Blocks which remain outside of the Field at the end of a Match will be considered “in” the Supply Zone (i.e., the Supply Zone will not be eligible to be Cleared).



<RSC6> Starting an Autonomous Coding Skills Match. Drivers must start a Robot’s Autonomous Coding Skills Match routine by pressing a button on the Robot Brain or manually activating a sensor. Because there is no VEX IQ Controller hand-off, only one (1) Driver is required for an Autonomous Coding Skills Match (though Teams may still have two (2) if desired).

  1. Pre-match sensor calibration is considered part of the standard pre-Match setup time (i.e., the time when the Team would typically be turning on the Robot, moving any mechanisms to their desired legal start position, etc.).
  2. Pressing a button on the VEX IQ Controller to begin the routine is not permitted. To avoid any confusion, Teams are advised not to bring controllers to Autonomous Coding Skills Match.

In accordance with <T6>, Teams should be mindful of event schedules and set their Robot up as promptly as possible. The definition of “prompt” is at the discretion of the Event Partner and Head Referee, and could depend on things like how much time is left for the Skills Challenge field(s) to be open, how many Teams are waiting in line, etc. As a general guideline, three seconds to calibrate a Gyro Sensor would be acceptable, but three minutes to debug a program would not.


<RSC7> Skills Stop Time. If a Team wishes to end their Robot Skills Match early, they may elect to record a Skills Stop Time. This is used as a tiebreaker for Robot Skills Challenge rankings. A Skills Stop Time does not affect a Team’s score for a given Robot Skills Match. Drivers and field staff must agree prior to the Match on the signal that will be used to end the Match early.

  1. As noted in the definition of Skills Stop Time, the moment when the Match ends early is defined as the moment when the Robot and Blocks have come to a rest and the Driver provides the agreed upon visual and audio signal to the Scorekeeper Referee.
  2. Teams who intend to attempt a Skills Stop Time must “opt-in” by verbally confirming with the Scorekeeper Referee prior to the Robot Skills Match. If no notification is given prior to the start of the Match, then the Team forfeits their option to record a Skills Stop Time for that Match.
  3. This conversation should include informing the Scorekeeper Referee which Driver will signal the stop. The Match may only be ended early by a Driver for that Match.
  4. The agreed-upon signal to stop the match must be both verbal and visual, such as Drivers crossing their arms in an “X” or placing their VEX IQ Controller on the ground.
  5. It is recommended that the Driver also provides a verbal notice that they are approaching their Skills Stop Time, such as counting out “3-2-1-stop.”
  6. If a Team runs multiple Robot Skills Matches in a row, they must reconfirm their Skills Stop Time choice with the Scorekeeper Referee prior to each Match.
  7. Any questions regarding a Skills Stop Time should be reviewed and settled immediately following the Match. <T1> and <T3> apply to Robot Skills Matches.

Robot Skills at League Events


At league events in which Teams may submit Robot Skills Challenge scores across multiple days / sessions, the Robot Skills scores (combined highest Autonomous Coding Skills Match and Driving Skills Match scores) used for rankings will be calculated from Matches within the same session.

For example, consider the following scores for a hypothetical Team across two league event sessions:

Autonomous Coding Skills Match

Driving Skills Match

Robot Skills Score

Session 1

100

100

200

Session 2

150

40

190

This Team would have a Robot Skills score of 200 for this event, and their scores from Session 1 would be used for the Event and Global tiebreakers listed in the above two sections.